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  #21  
Old 12-13-2011, 06:28
Matches Matches is offline
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This post is gay (wait what)

Personally, I think that marriage in of itself is an odd tradition anyway, for anyone. Although the benefits of such a thing are clear, I don't find it necessary to bring two people together in a legally-binding matrimony to consider them 'married.' They're often held for sketchy reasons: for money or citizenship, perhaps. If two people want to be recognized as married in the eyes of the institution itself for real, genuine reasons instead of unsavory ones, I think the government should support it fully. All queers have the same rights as any other person, and they should be able to have the full benefits that come with marriage if they do so decide that they want to be wed. There is no good reason to prevent gay marriage, because if they continue, it's not like a gay man will leave his want-to-be husband saying, "Well. I tried. I think I'm going to go for women now, instead." The whole justification for not allowing it seems almost comical, especially for 2012, and especially-especially for me--a Massachusetts citizen.

I've been well aware of the kids that are tormented and sad because of their sexual identification. They often feel alone and 'wrong' for just who they are. I'm very glad, however, for the new steps being taken to prevent such things. There are GSAs all over the country now, and AGLYs, and marches and peaceful protests and parades! It is not that there are 'more queers now,' as I often hear from older generations, but it is becoming more and more safe for them to come out and more easily find support.

I agree with firebird32's excerpt about John Albuquerque: " I admire his strength to deal with the situation on his own. He took a brave approach of not getting others involved, but dealing with this himself." I believe that its wonderful that people are coming together to be seen and heard, and more importantly, accepted. However when people are passive to others, especially hate-filled people that only instigate and whose aim is to hurt, it is more then commendable, because they can keep their chins up.

Miller's story was a little unsettling. I was aware of the Don't Ask Don't Tell policy in place, but I never (until recently) became aware of the ridiculousness of it. It's so wrong for the military to censor its troops' letters, and it infuriates me that they can discriminate people for whom they're attracted to. It dwindles my sense of humanity, moreso because the idea seems so obsolete, insensitive, and irrelevant to what the military aims to do: help and protect. I remember seeing somewhere, an interview with another military man who supported it. He said something like: "Well, I just don't want to fight for my home next to some fairy-boy." This leads into my next point about Sethi, who was discriminated even by those who were supposed to love her the most, through thick and thin: her family. It makes me uneasy more than anything that someone can do that to their own flesh and blood rather than just accepting them for who they are. Letting go that someone is gay should certainly be easier than letting go of them. He sister may have been questioning her religious morals, but I question the sister's humanity.

In the "fag-infested Boston Latin School," as Westboro Baptist Chuch called it on their website some time ago, I've accepted every person for who they are, not who they like. There are some who twinge at the news, but then they get over it. And even less who think it is 'wrong.' Each generation has become more accepting than the last, and although ours is far from perfect, there's definitely progress being made. Honestly, I can't see the difference in a person for who they might be attracted to. And it's certainly none of my business, I'll never understand the hate.
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  #22  
Old 12-13-2011, 06:46
NotOfThisWorld NotOfThisWorld is offline
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Things are getting better, but is that good enough?

I think things are getting better in the LGBT Youth then things were for them in the past. It is now (slightly) safer for them to come out. There are GSA's in schools. Some churches are even okay with openly gay members. There are more safe havens and outlets for LGBT Youth to go to and participate in. Schools, although they may have ALOT of problems,are becoming more accepting of LGBT youth in terms of classmates and some teachers. More people are understanding and accepting, and if they are not accepting they are at least tolerant. Gay couples can be seen in media and tv, so it is becoming a better environment on the whole.

But there still is a huge amount of work to do. This issue needs to be addressed and dealt with as firmly as racism , if not more so. It is clear from the sideshows and stories that it does get better, but it shouldn't even have to be this bad. That is where the problem lies. We need to come to a point in society where everyone can accept everyone. Do you have to agree? No. Do you have to believe in it? No. But everyone should be at bare minimum respectful, because no matter what your views are, all people deserve respect. All people also deserve equal rights. It is absolutely unfair that LGBT community does not have the right to marry in all states. I can personally say I don't agree with it, those are my views, but if your living in America and don't have the rights of the person next to you, that is wrong, regardless of views. Especially since there is supposed to be a separation of church and state, then one can't even claim that Christianity is the reason for this unfairness.

The Church is another issue, because they need to be accepting of all people. It is hypocritical if they are not. If you are a Christian, then who are you to judge anyone? Christians are supposed to be loving towards all people, so if Christians are acting hateful towards any group of people it is wrong. Jesus was said to have been accepting and loving of all people, so it infuriates me when I hear the phrase "God hates F**". It is not simply offensive but also wrong. In reference to the Bible, it does state that homosexuality is a sin. However there are many things that Christians view as sin that most people do not.So the same hypocritical Church leaders saying and doing terrible things should humble themselves and realize what they are doing is wrong. It also says that "everyone has sinned and fallen short of the glory of God..", so no person or group of people has the right to say "homosexuality is an abomination" or to use offensive words against people who are gay,lesbian, transgender, undecided etc.

Homophobia is unfortunately a very tolerated and widespread prejudice. I mean you can turn on the tv to the Republican debates and it is very evident . Homosexuals can't even marry in many states, and if they are married and go to another state their marriage could be considered void. That is outrageous. It is tolerated because media and society allow it to be. Hearing John Alburquerque's story was terrible. No one should be put through loneliness and suffering like that, no one deserves to be verbally, physically, or mentally assaulted simply because they have a different preference. It is disgusting that it happens. But the problem is that its happening everyday around us. People still call other people "f**" if they do something/ say something that is deemed effeminate or homosexual. As we saw in the hallway people still harbor alot of hatred and anti-gay sentiments. Until just recently gays couldn't even serve openly in the army. I relate to Matches because I didn't really know how bad it was until I saw the Thomas Miller slideshow. To think that men and women are willing to die for this country can't even be free to say what they feel is absolutely horrendous. While I acknowledge that something is being done, I also realize it is simply not enough.

Last edited by NotOfThisWorld; 12-13-2011 at 06:49.
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  #23  
Old 12-13-2011, 07:50
icetea icetea is offline
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This is hard for me to say, but I had never been very accepting towards homosexuality. My family is very conservative and the topic hasn’t really ever come up. I had always thought that if a homosexual tried hard enough, they could be a “normal” person because that is just what is biologically right. I remember in The Diary of Anne Frank, there was a phase in which she wanted a girl-friend and then realized that what she really wanted was a boyfriend. So I thought maybe it’s a passing phase for everyone? The idea of a girl being with a girl or a guy being with a guy is just so weird and foreign to me. Perhaps it’s just because I have had so little exposure to it and do not have friends who happen to be homosexual. It is hard for me to not see it as a perversion, but I am really trying to be more accepting. I would never put anyone down for it though; it is just a sort of quiet disapproval. What I dislike is the act, not the person if you know what I mean.
After seeing the stories of people, I genuinely feel bad for what the LGBT community have to go through. The fact that the suicide rate for them is so high is really saddening.
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  #24  
Old 12-13-2011, 10:39
pianoplayah09 pianoplayah09 is offline
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Are things getting better?

To start off, I completely understand with what icetea is saying. My family is very conservative and where I come from acts of racism / and hatred for people that are homosexuals isn't looked down on. It's a somewhat accepted fact that I am completely ashamed of.

Now, whether things are getting better or now; I personally think that things are a lot better, in comparison to the way that they used to be. However, this in no way means that we are where we need to be. John Albuquerque story, as DIRTANDGLITTER pointed out, is the most alarming story of the stories in that segment. However, John was lucky enough to "snap out of it" as he said, and to change his mind from suicide. There are many many gay teens who find themselves so hurt by bullying because of their sexual choices that they take their own lives. An example is of the boy who took a picture and tweeted to Lady Gaga, saying that he was going to kill himself (I forget the name now). His story was somewhat publicized because of Lady Gaga. Unfortunately though, not all cases are publicized, leaving hundreds of teens to take their own lives without anyone taking notice of it and learning that bullying them is not okay.

I think that people our age are more accepting to LGBTQ because we lives in times where things are different: when our parents were young, interracial dating was not widely accepted, where as now it is more so. The same I feel goes for LGBTQ couples; And I like to think positively that this trend will continue and that soon everyone will be able to accept that people will love who they love.

I just wanted to reply to NOTOFTHISWORLD's comment about churches judging those who are gay: Yes, there are churches who openly hate gays but not all churches are like that. I don't think that it is fair to stereotype and say that all churches are that way; The churches that I have seen condone Gay people, yet they love them, or teach others to love them in the same way, because everyone is a human being.

Homophobia is a very tolerated prejudice. This is , obviously due to the fact that majority of the people in this country, or maybe not majority but a large number of the people in the country don't see it as a negative prejudice. They don't see it as a bad thing for hating gays. Obviously, that's not okay and any acts of homophobia are not okay; To hate someone because of whom they chose or chose not to relate themselves with is absolutely outrageous to me.

On a note to end on: I recently saw someone, a homosexual, who oftenly posts on facebook how people are sooooo homophobic, and look at (him/her) differently because they're that way, yet they posted that they saw a "white boy"..... I just think it's funny how someone who obviously knows the importance of prejudice and using terms such as "that's so gay" and "fag" can sit there and specify the person by their race ...
It's the same sort of thing ...
My point by this little anecdote is that though things have gotten better, in terms of homophobia, racism, and just everything, we still have a very long way to go until we acheive a point where everyone is okay with everyone else and can treat other human beings as equals, without distinguishing them for any trait of theirs.
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  #25  
Old 12-13-2011, 11:26
footballstud94 footballstud94 is offline
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Time for Change

I do think that things are better for the LGBTQ community in todays society. There was almost no tolerance for them in the past. I'm not saying that society as a whole today completely accepts them with open arms, but there are efforts being made. Youth especially are spreading the word about acceptance and equality. There are even clubs in schools that bring together straight and LGBTQ teens . However, there is still a large majority of people who are close minded about accepting LGBTQ people.I agree with Jordanrose107 that society doesn't understand that a persons sexual identity doesn't have anything to do with who they are as a person.

As a whole, we still have so much work to do so that LGBTQ teens are treated equally. I think that there needs top be more social awareness. As the slideshows indicated, there is still much prejudice against LGBTQ teens. I think that it would help if there were more support groups for them. Often times they feel isolated because prejudice against them is still tolerable. I think that people don't want to stick up for LGBTQ teens because they dont want their sexuality to be questioned. The only way things are going to change is if society becomes more open minded.
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  #26  
Old 12-13-2011, 11:26
freedomtolead freedomtolead is offline
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Are things really getting better?

So for this post I asked a couple of people the questions because I was interested in what they would comment on the LGBTQ topic. The two people I asked said they believed that things are better today than they were in the past for the LGBTQ youth because “before they believed opposite sex marriages as correct. Now people are free’ish to do what they want and now people don’t really judge you or make fun of you. Plus, they can walk around freely, get married, and they have laws that protect them.” Although I agree that things have become a lot better for the LGBTQ youth, I believe we still need change. I was hoping the topic of religion would come up because it plays a major role when it comes to this topic.

NotOfThisWorld and Pianoplayah09 bring up interesting points. There are many churches that are openly hateful towards same sex relationships/marriages but there are also many churches that aren’t like that at all. But I feel like it’s the same as people: some people are homophobic and others love gays.

1 Corinthians 13:13
And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.

The reason why I wanted to bring up religion, specifically Christianity, is because I know that the church and the Bible are all about preaching about unity and love but are often times – hypocritical- (sorry to say). We are quick to judge, quick to prejudge, and quick to discriminate…

1 Corinthians 13:4–8a
Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, and always perseveres. Love never fails...

Sure it’s easy to grab you Bible and principles and point out the wrong but doesn’t God, in the Bible, same come as you are?

I do believe we have to change but we won’t have that change until we agree to accept people as what they are- people. I don’t believe people should be punished for who they like, as in Miller’s story. If heterosexuals show their love by having weddings with decorations, guests, halls, music, dancing, the works… why should homosexuals keep their love silent?

I agree with Johnnyangel11 when (he/she) said “Homophobia is a very tolerated prejudice. It seems as though people avert their eyes from it. I see it happen all of the time, and I don't think people realize just how much we can see it happen. I know sometimes, people get discouraged to make it stop. I get discouraged myself. But that doesn't mean I support it. I DON'T! I feel as though homophobia, just like racism, or sexism just isn't going to stop, and that's scary. I don't want these things to be tolerated, but for some reason, I feel as though homophobia is the last thing on the list that people are eager to fix. With times changing, hopefully this will change as well.” It’s a lot easier to discriminate against gays than any race but I also feel like it’s because they are the ‘it’ of the moment. It was easy to discriminate against blacks because they were different and then they became part of us (our diversity) just like Asians, whites, the Irish, etc. although some discrimination still exists- we’ve accepted it for the most part.
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  #27  
Old 12-13-2011, 19:36
icetea icetea is offline
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Reactions to Homosexuality (Post Part 2)

I think freedomtolead’s comment on how maybe homosexuals are the “it” of the moment is very interesting. It really may be a phase that society is going through just like how it was with the Irish, blacks, Jewish, Asians, and others.

Today, it seems like certain states are much more accepting towards LGBT youth than others. Massachusetts is probably one of the best in this respect and Texas is one of the worst. This is interesting and suggests that there is hope. I think that when the people around you treat the issue as if it were ok and something normal, you tend to do so as well. There is a lot of work we have to do though. I think the media helps a lot. The show “Glee” is highly popular and the fact that it includes characters that are homosexual really helps. They are very likeable characters that people can connect easily with.

My reactions to the slideshows:

Joel Brimmerman- I think that it is really unfortunate for a person to be born into the wrong gender. It is a bit hard for me to understand how he feels. However, I think if I kept the same mindset and was the opposite gender, it would be really confusing. It takes a lot of courage to undergo a surgery and a lot of determination as well. It’s good to hear that he had so much support at his school.

Elsie Sethi- I can’t help but feel uncomfortable seeing the two girls together just because I haven’t been very exposed to it. It looks so strange to me, just like two friends, not people who are in love. But I do believe that people have the right to be with whoever they want without being condemned for it. As for me, I would probably look away and put it out of my mind.

John Albuquerque- It is wrong for him to be bullied for what he is. I bet it would be hard not to feel very alone when society is so dominantly heterosexual. Like a lot of other LGBT, he sometimes has suicidal thoughts because he doesn’t want to live in a society that is so against what he is. I feel bad because I can’t find it in me to support homosexuality but I hate that LGBT have to suffer because of people like me can’t accept it. It’s a difficult question.
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  #28  
Old 12-13-2011, 22:10
cookiemonster cookiemonster is offline
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“And now, I'm just trying to change the world, one sequin at a time.”

I really enjoyed watching these clips. They were personal on a very touching level and the photographs perfectly captured everyday moments and feelings from the lives of these kids. There seems to be an almost wise sense that each of them gives off; this probably just comes from having view oneself in a new light and deal with different obstacles than other kids. They are all very mature and inspiring.

John Alburquerque’s story was the first one I watched and I had to watch it again after I got a sense of the format of the pieces. His story really touched me when he got to the part about being attacked and harassed and immediately texting his gay friends that he had found online and confided in. I don’t even know why, but this part made me cry. Something about the sense of being alone in one’s own house, yet there is still so much love and support out there. I really just want to sit down with John and talk. He seems like a genuinely sweet person.

Kailey Cox’s story impressed me. She is so mature for a 15 year old and her devotion to and interpretation of God is lovely. She speaks so eloquently and I liked the part where she talked about God creating her to be perfect in the way she is and that includes being gay. He makes no mistakes. I don’t personally believe in God per se, but I do think that everyone is unique and made without mistakes. There is a reason for everything and we need to embrace the idiosyncrasies of every individual. As Jordanrose107 said, “She doesn't want her sexual orientation to be the only thing she is know for.” I thnk this is true for every gay person. They don’t want to be defined by their sexuality and just want to be embraced for who they are as a PERSON.


Elsie Sethi’s story was just really sweet. I like how she talks about the first time she walked down the school hallways while holding hands with her girlfriend. She didn’t know how people would react, but her love for herself and her girlfriend were very strong. Her confidence inspired other couples to come out too and I think this is very powerful. It shows power in community and love and support of all couples no matter what their sexual orientation is. I liked that they talked about prom because that is such a stereotypical image depicted in pop culture and now they were dealing with it in a new light. Elsie was embracing her life and love and painted an almost fairy tale picture for the future.

There is something that I was thinking about today in class. There was a picture on the projector of a man holding a sign that said something along the lines of “No special laws for f***!”. Ok. First of all, there ARE special laws. The laws that say that marriage is only between a man and a woman are “special laws” that limit gays from fully legalizing their love. The only thing that “special laws” would do would be to make all men and women equal, so I don’t understand why this man was so angry. It is not like gay people would be put at an advantage in society; everyone would just be on the same playing field. It all confuses me.

Also, a point I noticed that came up a lot had to do with people that ARE homophobic. Manifestations called these people “horrible” and I would have to agree with FluffyMuffin and NotanAthlete by saying that I don’t think these people are horrible. They may be confused by things people have told them, or maybe they are struggling with their own sexual feelings, or maybe they have been raised by a family that tells them certain things. They just are having trouble accepting things that are out of the norm. As Frank Sinatra pointed out,“what do you think about the homophobic people who bully homosexuals to the point that the person takes their own life?” I may have a way to optimistic view of people, but I still don’t see these people as horrible. I don’t know, I guess you just need to see the whole picture of people’s lives and not just one instance in which they performed undesirably. Obviously there are cases like that of Matthew Shepard that involved some pretty brutal treatment of gays. When there are direct acts of violence on people (regardless of whatever motive) this is a little different. This is taking a bit of a rambling turn and I don’t actually know where I am going with it now, but basically I just don’t see any person as horrible. I think…

One last thing that has come to mind as we are discussing this topic was the question “Why do you feel the need to show off your gayness so openly?” I feel that this isn’t just people being uncomfortable with gay people, I think it can apply to anyone. No one likes too much PDA from any couple and any body who was in this kind of relationship could be asked this question.

I think those were all the lingering points in my mind. I just really hope that I live to see a day in the future when everyone gets along with everyone else. I know that sounds cheesy, but this course has brought to light all the very real problems that people have with other people in our society today and I hope that someday this will not be the case. We are all beautiful people and the world is an amazing place. Let’s not wreck this gift while we have it.
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  #29  
Old 12-14-2011, 21:24
blssuperfan12 blssuperfan12 is offline
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freeelephant...I don't pledge allegiance to the flag either

Just like other types of discrimination, I feel like its presence has died down over time. In many different aspects is 2011 a unique year and time period for the country. Like pianoplayah09 points out, we have grown to be a lot more aware and accepting of the various backgrounds that we are surrounded by. With that being said, I know there is still a great population of people who suffer from homophobia, but I wasn't aware of the way that it still be acted on so harshly, like in the case of John Alburqueque. I will never understand how someone could generate so much hate for someone else that they don't know, that they would want to harm them so badly. I am glad that John is able to seek out ways to get support for his situation, but there is clearly a lack of those types of resources for the LGBT community. Despite what Michele Bachmann said in the clip we viewed, this community is an underrepresented and discriminated group.

Because I am not a part of this community I feel like I am not always aware of what is going on and all of the politics that go on with it. In class last Friday with Mr. Corbett was appreciated, because it opened my eyes to some of the laws that surround homosexuality, and the more I learned the more that I found it ridiculous. There clearly needs to be a solution for these issues, and I applaud activists who work toward gaining the rights they deserve. I think like other revolutionary movements in our history, hard work and perseverance within the LGBT community will bring about change in the future.
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  #30  
Old 12-18-2011, 15:26
FluffyMuffin FluffyMuffin is offline
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Response to Frank Sinatra

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Sinatra View Post
And to comment on FluffyMuffin's post, when you said, "People who are homophobic aren’t horrible, it’s possible that they just aren’t exposed to LGBTQ people in the proper environment or are simply ignorant," what do you think about the homophobic people who bully homosexuals to the point that the person takes their own life?
In the situation where one bullies another to the point of suicide there is double blame. Suicide is one of the only things he as humans have full control over. Although the person bullying doing the bullying may provoke the suicide, it is ultimately in the power of the person commuting the suicide. Weather the person is homophobic or not I feel is irrelevant because not all homophobics bully people to the point of suicide, and not all people who commit suicide are a victim of bullying, not to mention a victim of homophobic bullying. Someone could bully someone because they have glasses and have that person commit suicide. That doesn't make everyone who hates people with glasses awful people.
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  #31  
Old 04-11-2012, 19:31
thanksalot thanksalot is offline
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Gay rights

Reading the article and listening to the young adults tell their stories got me wondering: What percent of people in the world are gay, or for that matter, anything other than straight? What percent of Americans identify under LGBTQ? Has there been an increase in non-straight individuals, or just an increase in people coming out as non-straight? It’s clear that there are still LGBTQ youth being targeted for their sexual orientation, but things overall do seem to be improving. Don’t Ask Don’t Tell has finally been repealed, which is one more step towards equality.


Yes, we do have more work to do. Homophobia is still largely a tolerated prejudice. There are plenty of openly anti-gay Americans, far more than there are openly anti-black, anti-women, or anti-Jewish Americans. These other prejudices are for the most part socially unacceptable, whereas homophobia is still acceptable. So I would disagree with NotanAthlete that homophobia isn’t tolerated any more than racism is. I actually think that homophobia is seen by many as the norm. When I was listening to the teenagers in the slide shows tell their stories, my heart went out to them and I wondered why there is still so much adamant dislike towards the LGBTQ community.


I agree with Johnnyangel11 that homophobia is probably low on the list of problems for people to address. Heterosexual Americans may feel like they have more important issues to worry about. Similar to Shelly3101, the story that stuck with me the most was that of Kailey Cox. It was amazing how when she finally came out to her family and her church, they were so supportive of her, even though she had thought they’d be upset that she was supposedly going against their religion. The story of Elsie Sethi was also very interesting. It gave me hope to learn about how accepting her school community was of her for the most part when she became openly gay.
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