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  #21  
Old 10-22-2009, 00:43
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White Privilege

I think that after our discussion a few days ago, we can conclude than not all of Peggy McIntosh's privileges were true just for whites. I don't think that there is much a white privilege than a complete race privilege. In the SNL video we watched, we saw white people conspiring together, giving favoritism to whites over blacks. In my opinion, if there was true white privilege, then whites would get the benefits from all races; however, we've seen this type of behavior back during the Civil Rights movement. Whites get privileges from other whites, same as blacks may get privileges from other blacks, etc.

I think depending on location, one may notice more white favoritism. In a city like Boston, I doubt that anyone would escape giving out, or receiving. certain racial privileges. While reading the privileges Ms. McIntosh proposed, the whole class agreed than many of them could work for any race. There was one that struck me as being somewhat true. As bad as it is, there is still racial profiling, predetermined judgement of an individual because of the skin color.

I think the closest I've been to a racial privilege was when I at a Chinese restaurant with my family. Aroud us were white families. As a family, we finished our bowl of rice, and without missing a beat, the waiter brought a new bowl of rice, free of charge (when it cost $1 extra). I looked at the other families who finishe their bowl of rice, and were clearly not finished. They did not receive another bowl of rice.

It is unethical. It is prejudice against others and unfair. However, most people must admit that it feels nice to get special treatment for being who you are.
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  #22  
Old 10-22-2009, 00:58
Black Ice Black Ice is offline
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White privilege, as many people have said, is an attribute that is still very strong in today’s society. Its subliminal nature may make people not notice it but it is definitely there. One can argue that white privilege has considerably decreased from previous decades, but if you take a close look at society today, it is still thriving. Minorities are not receiving the same equal opportunities that white people may receive.

In Peggy McIntosh’s article on white privilege, she outlines twenty three points that she considers as examples of white privilege. I found that many of these points were irrelevelent and outdated, considering the nineteen years that have passed since its publication, but many of the points could not have spoken more true. One of the points that distinctively stood out and is definitely relevant in today’s society is point number seventeen which says “If a traffic cop pulls me over, or if the IRS audits my tax return, I can be sure I haven’t been singled out because of my race.” As many people have said earlier and is in unanimous agreement, this is a prime example of racial profiling. I have seen in person and heard in the news all the time that cops pull over more minorities than white people just because of their race. If a white cop pulls over a white person, it is more likely that they will have it easier than let’s say a black person that gets pulled over. Racial profiling is clearly evident and speaks to white privileges. Another interesting point that McIntosh mentions in her article is number twenty three which states “ I can choose blemish cover or bandages in “flesh” color that more or less matches my skin.” If you go into any supermarket or pharmacy, you will always find bandages that are geared towards those with fair skin. I have never seen a dark-colored bandage or any other color for that matter besides the default tan/white. Makeup is also geared towards those with fair skin. Although, there is dark-colored makeup, it’s not as common as fair-colored makeup.

One experience in which I was the beneficiary of an unearned privilege was during my summer job application process. I worked as a lifeguard over the summer and the process of applying was very rigorous because of the location. In the final round of selection, I was competing against a white person for the final job spot. We had the same credentials, went to the same school, and were equally qualified for the job. However, I received the job over him. I later found out that my lifeguarding team consisted of mainly minorities, no white people. Essentially, this was the reverse of white privilege, and it worked in my favor. Although veiled, white privilege is still a prominent attribute in today’s society.
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  #23  
Old 10-22-2009, 08:48
SlickBostonian SlickBostonian is offline
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White Privilege

For many of the cases made by her, they are obviously not exclusively "white privileges". But for a couple, they are sadly still considered a white privilege, if you live in American cities where white people are a majority.
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  #24  
Old 10-22-2009, 19:30
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Priveleged

In some ways I do think White Privelege exists, but more so as the absence of discrimination than intentional favoring. Its no different from discrimination being an inherent part of our society, White Privelege is as well. Back in the Jim Crow days, whites were always favored and priveleged by other whites (and blacks) simply because they were white. Just as that discriminatory pattern has trickled down so has "The Privelege". I do not think it is anything intentional other than by the racists who favor white supremacy.

But, as Quiet Shadow commented, there is privelege for every race just not quite as often or as subtle. If you go to a Mexican or Chinese restaurant, those who come in speaking te native language are more likely to get better food and be treated better than those who don't. Think of it as a club, those who are in the club already know what to expect and know the people they will see. Those who are new to the club, will have a harder time getting in the swing of things. ANd thpose who arent part of the club can be completely clueless as to what the point of the club is. Kinda like JCL.

McIntosh's findings and conclusions didnt surprise me at all. From what I can tell, those certainly did occur twenty years ago and partially still do today. But hopefully they will soon be eliminated as a rite of favoritism and people will become colorless, and in effect "privilege-less".
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  #25  
Old 10-26-2009, 00:24
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White Privilege

Eddie Murphey and his comical ways prove a point in his SNL skit. White Privilege does indeed exist, although not to the over exaggerated situations in the skit, but in other suttle ways.

In Peggy McIntosh's examples of white privilege, there are some that are outdated, but there are others that are still evident today. For example, number 18. I can easily buy posters, picture books, dolls, toys, and children's magazines featuring people of my race, is a valid point. It is much easier to find a white doll than a black doll. Even more difficult to find an asian doll. Nevermind considering an Indian doll. How about number 23? Flesh colored bandages, and even flesh/nude colored tights? They are colors that are closest to those of white people. These points support my hypothesis that this white privilege is developed from the basis of the fact that the majority of people in the country are "white" and that our past history of having this country lead by "white people". If it were the other way around, say that the majority of people in the US were "black" and that "black people" lead the country in the past and so on, nude colored tights would be closest to those of black people.

I think that as much as this white privelege exists, it is slowly but surely fading away. I mean, this piece was written in the 90's and that was last decade, so much has changed and developed within the past 15 to 20 years that it gives me hope on the future years to come. I have not lost faith that eventually, in my lifetime, complete equality will succeed and we will see each other as humans, not as races.
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  #26  
Old 10-29-2009, 00:00
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White Privilege

I do believe that white privilege exists. So many times I've seen or heard of "white" people getting away with things because of the color of their skin. I see it with my own two eyes where I work.

There was one time a couple of "black" people came in the restaurant late at night when it was relatively empty. They all sat down at a round table and they looked like they were having a good time. Such a good time, in fact, that they started to get really loud. You could hear them laughing from the kitchen. My I (white) manager was getting annoyed and went to their table and told them to quiet down a little. Countless of times there are "white" people coming in as well and they can get pretty loud themselves. Does anyone go to their table and ask them to quiet down? I'll let you answer that...

I think that Ms. McIntosh's comments are generally true. For example, number three. She states that she can be pretty sure that she can go shopping alone most of the time, pretty well assured that she will not be followed. When my partner and I read this in class, she, being "black", immediately agreed with this statement. She said that whenever she goes to the store, she will be followed; because of her skin color, they'll assume she's going to steal. Somethings that McIntosh states, I don't really agree it's white privilege. For example, going to a music store and finding music of her race represented. Nowadays, music stores are divided into genres. You can find anything from Rock to Pop to Classical to Jazz. Race is not an issue here.

I believe that white privilege will continue to exist as long as people see each other by their skin tone and not who they truly are on the inside.
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  #27  
Old 10-30-2009, 00:45
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white privilege.

I believe that it is less of a privilege more than it is a stereotype or a mask to hide behind. I know from my mother that she often judges more from skin color than she does from personality. She doesn't give black people the chance to speak and show her that they're actually intelligent. She's very judgmental, but I suppose that's because of her upbringing. My grandmother herself was very racist and in growing up in such a family, it was only natural for my mother to accept such things like that.

My mother, for instance, if I tell her that "MY FRIEND ZHONGMEI LEARNED HOW TO PLAY THIS SONG TODAY" and the first thing out of her mouth will be "OH IS SHE ASIAN?" I swear I want to face palm every time she says something stupid like that. It's seriously annoying and it just makes me think of the sterotypes and how my mother doesn't take into consideration having me explain who the person is, rather she just takes everything at face value, literally, at the color of the persons face.

I believe that sure, maybe there is some underlying hint of white privilege in today's society. But I think as the older generation is replaced by a newer older generation, this privilege will begin to fall out of style.
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  #28  
Old 11-02-2009, 22:22
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White Privilege and Society

McIntosh’s observations are very interesting. Some of them are very true, while some of them may have only been true in the past. Even though this is so it is funny how these white “privileges,” that existed in the past can still be found in the present day. Time has not erased all these things that just shouldn’t be. To think that many of these white privileges existed while I grew up was horrible; the biggest one I remember was one involving toy stores. I can vouch that it was one of the biggest struggles for me to go into a toy store and find a Barbie that was similar to my skin. There never seemed to be an attrition of white Barbies, but apparently when it came to Barbies of another race the attrition hit hard. To this very day there is still a problem, to the point where there is now a doll line for people of minorities, Bratz.

It is clear that race and class are interlocked. These are the first few things that people judge you on. Race and Class are the two categories in which the world around us is divided in to. This is what our society is built on, and it can’t be helped. Categories and labels make things so much easier for everyone, whether it be things or people. We judge before we question and label from what we see before from what we learn. Because people have become so accustomed to this way of life it is hard to stray away. It’s hard not to want to try to fill quotas and not give some people privileges because you feel for them.

Society has organized itself in a way that may not be kind, may nor be moral, but in a way that requires you do to nothing more than what you would ordinarily do when you first see or meet someone.
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